Holiday Sale Invited Artists

We are so honored to have such an amazing group of potters join us for the Objective Clay Holiday Sale. We wanted to share some of our thoughts on how we selected the invited artists.

Doug Peltzman invites Adam Field
I first met Adam in 2012 at the Utilitarian Clay Symposium. We instantly connected on many levels. One being our somewhat compulsive tendency to focus on every detail in the objects we make. Another being our desire to share knowledge, work hard and have fun. In that sprit, we have taught numerous workshops together over the past few years. We love the interplay when working together and when sharing our approaches to clay. I have a deep respect for Adam’s dedication to his family, his work, and the ceramics community at large. His commitment is inspiring, to say the least. I am honored and excited to have his stunning pots in the show this year!

Lindsay Oesterritter invites Tom Jaszczak
I first saw Tom Jaszczak's work when I visited Sandy Simon at Trax Gallery. Some of Tom's dishes were being used at the dinner table." Yes!" I thought to myself.  A few months later, I happened to be teaching a summer workshop at Penland, and Tom is one of the current ceramic residence there.

 I like that he keeps his forms relatively simple, lets the clay speak through the slips and glazes, and responds to the fired surface with the addition of clean geometric shapes, helping to highlight some of the subtleties in the surface. So nice. 

Jennifer Allen Invites Kari Radasch
I have long admired Kari’s work. She is fearless…unafraid to transform her work (even drastically) in order to communicate how her work reflects her changing life. 

What I love most about Kari’s work is it’s inherent playfulness. It evokes feelings of joy and optimism. The decoration seems to fall on her forms with the randomness of scattered confetti, grounded between floating layers of luster and thinly veiled white slip.  The forms are equally as spirited. While the “meat” of the form is handsome and stoic, details like scalloped edges, pillowed handles, stickered appliques and hanging charms add a sense of whimsy and nostalgia.

Kari's bowl

Kari's bowl

This pot (pictured to the right) is a new favorite. My kids are drawn to the colorful illustration and the handle fits their little mittens perfectly. Plus, they love that it holds snacks of all kinds.

Aside from Kari’s work, I admire her as an individual. Kari and I became fast friends when we demonstrated alongside eachother at Florida Heat Surface Symposium in St. Petersburg, FL (February 2016).  As a fellow parent, I am inspired by her keen ability to balance her career and motherhood. She embodies the life of a maker, a mother and a teacher with eloquence, class and individuality. Her personality shines as bright as her work.

Jennifer Allen and Kari Radasch at Florida Heat

Jennifer Allen and Kari Radasch at Florida Heat

I am beyond thrilled that she is joining our 2nd Annual Holiday Exhibition and am excited to share her work with all of you! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bryan Hopkins Invites Roberto Lugo
I chose Roberto Lugo to exhibit in the OC Holiday Sale. We first met when he signed up for a critique with me at the 2011 NCECA in Tampa, when he was an undergrad at KCAI and looking for input from a fellow Philly guy. Roberto is an inspirational teacher, a devoted husband, a loving father, and a caring friend. And his work rocks!

gwendolyn yoppolo Invites Kowkie Durst
When Kowkie and I met, we were both just learning how to throw pots in a class taught by Louise Harter at a community pottery in New York City.  As we worked with Louise to help build and fire a small wood kiln out in the country, our lives were transformed and we knew that we had found our passion.  After that experience, we each found our own path to take on our journey with clay.  Kowkie's work is at once comforting and unnerving.  The forms are familiar and inviting, but they present imagery that challenges cultural assumptions in a sometimes humorous way, with glimpses of processed foods, gay marriage, sweatshop labor, and gender binaries.  

Brian R. Jones Invites Victoria Christen
Victoria Christen was the first potter I met when after moving to Portland, OR ten years ago. Admirably, her work is always growing and influences that she brings into her pots like quilts and the midwest landscape ebb and flow with one another. 

My favorite tumbler by Ali!

My favorite tumbler by Ali!

Emily Schroeder Willis invites Alison Reintjes
Alison Reintjes and I met in the fall of 2001 when we were both long term residents at the Archie Bray Foundation with adjoining studio spaces.  At that time Ali was a more recent convert to clay having primarily worked in glass casting.  She had studied glass at Pilchuck just north of Seattle as well as at the Australian National University in Canberra, where I had just returned from a 4 month post-baccalaureate in ceramics.  Our friendship solidified as we relived our Australian experiences through shared storied over her husband Brandon’s delicious food! 

"Sounding" at the Missoula Art Museum.  Photo credit: Logan Photography

"Sounding" at the Missoula Art Museum.  Photo credit: Logan Photography

 During those two years together Ali and I developed a considerable friendship and have stayed in touch over time. I have always admired Ali’s work for the way she has these seemingly simple forms, layered patterns and glaze combinations that push and pull with one another. Maneuvering lines, brisk edges, rhythmic patterns, and geometric algorithms all harmonize in her work.  In the course of 15 years we have acquired a nice little collections of tumblers and bowls from her.  All are highly used but the tumbler shown is my go-to Gin & Tonic cup during hot summer days!  Another aspect I love is that Ali’s work strives for order amidst a constrained playfulness, which I feel is more prevalent in her sculpture pieces.  One of her more recent undertakings has been to pursue large-scale public art projects.  Her work has always walked this interesting line between sculpture and functional work and I am curious to see where some of these new projects lead her.

Over the past 15 years there have been both short and long trips between Chicago/Montana that have kept us in touch but one of the strongest ties that has kept us connected is both of our struggles to have children.  Ali has been a huge comforter and support to me as I struggled through 4 miscarriages and a failed IVF session, as well as being a sounding board (once we did have a child) on how to navigate the artist’s life with a child.  She has set a great example to me of prioritizing her family while still being an artist.  Ali set her studio practice on hold for four years while she raised her twins through their early years.  She is now just finishing up a home and studio renovation that will allow her to work from home!  I know that being a mom is a balancing act, but I am SO excited to see the new work that comes out of “Righteous Artworks” Studio.  And with that I am thrilled to have Ali be part of this exhibition.

A. Blair Clemo Invites Kelli Sinner

Kelli Sinner in her studio at Zentrum für Keramik in Berlin, Germany

Kelli Sinner in her studio at Zentrum für Keramik in Berlin, Germany

I met Kelli Sinner in the summer of 2012, while we shared a studio as resident artists at the Zentrum für Keramik in Berlin, Germany. We became fast friends over liters of beer and shimmying past one another in a tiny, shared kitchen. I felt an immediate kinship with Kelli and our conversations about art and life were rich seemingly without effort. She was working towards a solo show and I admired how “in the moment” her work was, many new forms and surfaces made in direct response to her experience in Berlin.

I live with several of Kelli’s pots, and they have become a part of my daily routine. They are as honest and insightful as she is. Her pots are direct and embody that living-in-the-moment feeling that I first noticed in our shared studio in Berlin. In her practice, no pot is an outlier, because each pot is addressed as an individual. I admire how varied her studio output is, each pots has just the right amount of unknown. Kelli seems to follow her ideas as they come, and her pots reflect that level of engagement. 

Kip O'Krongly Invites Yoko Sekino-Bove

The first time I met Yoko Sekino-Bove was during her 2010 McKnight residency at Northern Clay Center.  I was working as the studio materials technician and observing Yoko's process was an absolute revelation.  Her pots were delicate, powerful, and expertly crafted.  She spent much of her time at NCC testing and adapting an extensive body of cone 6 glazes - even her test tiles were beautiful little compositions.  From the simplest test tile, to her complex sculptural forms, I'm continually drawn in by Yoko's attention to detail and thoughtful execution.  But it is her ability to approach touchy subject matter with a refined and humorous touch that keeps me ever-inspired.  Thanks for joining us this holiday season, Yoko!